Thu, 29 Jul 2021 / Published in AlgoaFM, LATEST NEWS

“Leadership is all about the people. It’s not about organisations. Its not about plans. Its not about strategies. Its all about people – motivating people to get the job done. You have to be people-centred” – Colin Powell.

Mental health management has become a very important factor in all our lives. And for those in leadership roles, you not only have to be on top of your mental health, but that of your team members as well.

If we are to overcome the obstacles this pandemic has brought, our focus should be on our most valued asset, what we at Algoa FM call our “champions” – our people.

Coping with mental health challenges (our own and those of our staff) has always been part of our lives, but it has been kept a well-hidden secret, like something that we are embarrassed to share.

And as leaders, we were thrown in the deep end when Covid placed a spotlight on mental health and forced us to deal with the elephant in the room.

While mental illness has always been with us, international research collated by the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) has found that the prevalence of anxiety and depression has doubled in many countries around the world.

One of the first misconceptions that we need to overcome is that mental illness is a sign of some sort of weakness. It is an illness, much like any other, and we need to educate ourselves about it and understand it.

Here are some of my thoughts

  •  Educate yourself about mental health through reading articles and attending webinars Share your insights with your team – knowledge is power.
  • Have an open-door policy and listen when staff come to you with challenges
  • When team members reach out, it is important to listen and then act
  •  Be aware that team members will almost certainly have a member of their immediate family or social circle suffering from mental challenges – this will have a knock-on effect

Many will try to keep their challenges to themselves. Here are some signs too look out for:

  • Fatigue, changes in behaviour, being more aggressive in responses, poor work performance or throwing oneself completely into workday beyond 8-5, changes in appearances, changes in mood.
  • Warning bells should ring if you cannot get hold of staff working remotely. Many times, if you are not in a good space answering a phone or responding to a message or an email can be too much.
  • Reach out to staff. Have open, non-threatening conversations with your staff and allow them to express themselves
  • Reach out to your HR Department for guidance and assistance.

I find that sharing my personal experience with mental health and the challenges I am facing through this pandemic helps.

And I always find that it helps when people understand that they are not alone, and that others are also facing similar challenges. You may be surprised how much support and hope an open conversation can give your staff members.

One must never forget that leaders are under at least as much strain as their team members – and often more. We need to care for our own mental health.

Looking after yourself mentally is as important as the skills and knowledge that have seen you move into a leadership role.

Leaders set the example, and your team will cope better with the mental challenges of a Covid world if you show the way.

Few of us can do it alone – as part of the leadership team, we need to be there for each other.

Know that there will be times when you feel despondent and feel like you can’t cope any more.

During these times we need to be able to support and lean on each other.

Be patient and understanding, when someone in a meeting has a reaction that was maybe out of the norm, step back… don’t take it personally and hear the person out.

Tomorrow, it could be you who is struggling to control stress.

These are challenging times for all of us.

 About the author: Celeste Thomas – Algoa FM Human Resources Manager 

Celeste joined Algoa FM in 2013. Under her guidance the Human Resources department has established itself as a strategic arm of the business, which is integrated into all the media house’s operations. 

She also sits on the Board of Propella, a Gqebera-based business incubator geared to advance IT and manufacturing businesses.

“The world we live in is ever changing and as such I am always learning new things. My knowledge of the media industry has grown so much, and I am loving every minute of it. If you are innovative, creative, forward thinking and have the ability to adapt to different situations and still have a lot of fun while doing it…… then media is the industry for you,” says Celeste.

Thu, 29 Jul 2021 / Published in AlgoaFM, LATEST NEWS

Algoa FM’s Great Deal Promotion package for advertisers was ranked the best commercial promotion stunt/event in the country at the 2021 South African Radio Awards, which were presented on Friday, June 30.

In addition, Algoa FM managing director Alfie Jay was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame for his contribution to the industry during his career of more than 30 years.

“The Great Deal Promotion was a game changer for our commercial efforts in 2020,” says Jay.

“The innovative programme proved to be a great success, not only for our clients but also for ourselves in what truly was a very difficult year,” he adds.

Algoa FM was nominated as a finalist in three categories – Wayne Hart for best breakfast show presenter, the Virtual Algoa FM Big Walk for Cancer in the community project category, and the Algoa FM Great Deal Promotion in the promotions stunt/event category.

This bring to four, the number of times that Algoa FM has won the prestigious award for the best promotions stunt or event, having previously walked off with the spoils for its Heritage Day/Virtual Flag campaign, the launch campaign of the Algoa FM App and the annual Big Walk for Cancer.

“I am so very proud of my team for consistently innovating campaigns which deliver return on investment for our clients and stakeholders. This form of recognition says a lot about Algoa FM’s ability to impress on a national level,” says Jay.

Mon, 26 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, United Stations

Has anyone else noticed how conversations with agencies and clients are different now, especially about radio?

Ordinarily, these conversations focused on the radio station’s listenership stats and how much audience could be bought for how little. The cut and thrust of radio sales, I guess?

I am just not seeing that anymore. Advertisers are just not that interested in a station’s listenership as much as they are in a stations impact and connection with its audience. They are also not that interested in rates anymore (rate cards have become irrelevant anyway). Advertisers now need business solutions, not media plans.

The agency mantra of “how much for how little” is also being replaced by “results before reach”. Smaller media owners and their agility, hunger and innovation is competing (quite nicely in fact) with the larger stations who (and good for them) could always rely on a massive audience and historical momentum.

OK, so why is this? Well, maybe it’s because radio listening has changed too, certainly since lockdown. Where previously there was a clamour for space in the morning and afternoon drives, now the listening patterns are more evenly spread, and not as reliant on commuters pushing up the numbers.

People working from home (our clients included) are realising that you can’t work and watch TV, or work and read a newspaper, or work and browse the internet, or work and see a billboard. But you can work and listen to the radio, or a podcast even. In fact, radio has become so much more powerful now that many mainstream media are less relevant. Of course, this will not be forever, but the love affair with radio will last long after the pandemic becomes history. Radio needed a refresh, a rethink and a renewal, and I think we may have just got it.

I think I like it this way.

Written by Greg Norgarb, Creative Director at United Stations.

Wed, 21 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, Moneyweb

To further their efforts in sourcing and providing relevant content during and in the aftermath of the KZN/ Gauteng looting, Moneyweb will be running a donation drive to support the affected communities and small businesses.

ReBuild SA is a network of volunteers, NGOs, sponsors and donors who are assisting in rebuilding communities, small businesses, schools, clinics, homes and lives in South Africa’s riot-affected communities in KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

For more information and to donate, please visit the Moneyweb site here.

All proceeds will go directly to ReBuild SA.

Wed, 21 Jul 2021 / Published in AME, LATEST NEWS

In July of last year, Communications Minister Stella Ndabeni-Abrahams published a policy direction asking ICASA to fast track the licensing of digital radio broadcasting services in South Africa. Radio insiders were encouraged to see DAB+ mentioned specifically as an integral component of her digital radio standards plan.

A year on, the question of whether DAB+ is a viable opportunity in a country like ours — where radio is a huge medium for people to consume information, news, and entertainment every day — still lingers. One thing remains clear; although internet connectivity is improving around the country, there simply isn’t enough access or bandwidth for everyone to move from FM onto streaming. We need something else and DAB+ is a viable candidate that shows great promise. But what kind of impact could DAB+ have on the South African radio broadcasting landscape as a whole?

DAB+: A digital radio technology standard

Back in the late 1980’s, a digital radio technology standard was defined as part of a European research project. It laid the foundations for the creation of what we now know as DAB+ (digital audio broadcasting plus), a global radio standard that sets out to be a viable digital alternative to traditional AM/FM broadcasting. DAB+ is topical in South Africa because it was recently advertised in the Government Gazette — an encouraging sign that suggests forward motion and a goal to make it widely available to everyone in the long run.

Global integration

In the same way that the country has been slow on the uptake of digital terrestrial TV, there is an argument that DAB+ is nearly two decades late in South Africa. This is more evident when you consider that over 470 million people around the world can already receive DAB broadcasts.

Even though DAB is widely available elsewhere, widespread integration has been a challenge. Norway is one of the rare countries where DAB+ has been totally integrated and is the only choice for people to listen to alongside online streaming. Ireland is on the opposite end of the spectrum. The country switched off all DAB services in March of this year, citing cost effectiveness and low market penetration as some of the reasons for abandonment.

Access to receivers and the cost barrier

The examples of challenges elsewhere might indicate possible integration challenges in South Africa too. A key problem faced in many markets is that existing FM units are not able to pick up DAB+. They can’t even receive transmissions from DAB, its predecessor. Even radios that can receive DAB won’t be able to receive DAB+. Only DAB+ sets are backwards compatible, so all citizens will need these to gain access transmissions to begin with.

Because access to physical receivers is so limited, there would need to be conversations with companies who are able to manufacture and distribute these at low cost. With a base cost of roughly R300 for a bottom end DAB+ receiver there is a lot of ground to be covered before it becomes as popular as FM.   More advanced receivers that show pictures and streaming text are vastly more expensive. Although some new vehicles and cellphones have DAB+ capability built in, there is a long way to go to get mass coverage.

How DAB+ could change the face of radio in South Africa

If there was widespread access to receivers, and the cost barrier was removed, DAB+ could be a real game changer in South Africa. On a traditional transmitter, where you have one FM frequency, you have access to a single radio station. On a DAB mux (or multiplex), one “frequency” has around twenty different options to listen to, depending on the quality the broadcaster decides to stream. This gives broadcasters the opportunity to access multiple channels, to reach more audiences, and there is a major knock-on effect from there.

DAB+ would potentially create an additional layer of audio opportunity for radio stations in new markets that they wouldn’t have been able to reach through traditional AM or FM stations. Take Gqeberha based Algoa FM, for example. They could apply for a DAB frequency because they want to provide a service to audiences in Cape Town and Durban alongside their existing FM listener base. It would turn them into a national radio station overnight, without the worry of having to migrate shows to a streaming environment that won’t be able to handle the bandwidth load presented by their audience.  A group of established streaming stations could also apply for a DAB+ mux together and offer their existing on-line music and content services to a bigger audience.

An opportunity to serve the underserved

DAB+ could also allow stations like these to reach places that were truly unreachable before for the first time. It creates an opportunity for underserved (rural) communities to have access to broadcasts where traditional FM frequencies struggle to, can’t or haven’t been legally licensed to reach previously underserved communities. This creates a variety of engagement opportunities based on geography, religion, sport and even education. Consider an educational radio station with several DAB+ frequencies, broadcasting simultaneously across the entire country. It could target high school students during exam time, quite literally becoming the “William Smith” of radio and reaching millions of scholars in the process.

Opening a door to new brand synergies

The amplified broadcasting opportunities would also naturally open new opportunities for innovative brand synergies as well. Radio groups like the National Community Radio Forum or some of the existing commercial radio players could create DAB muxes where they have blended programming from several of their stations in territories where there aren’t FM receivers.

This is an advertiser’s dream, granting brands access to new markets through a vehicle that they know well and trust already. Consider campaigns that target people who speak a certain language but have never been able to listen to a station on traditional radio due to geographical constraints and the language barrier. With multiple streaming avenues and targeted campaigns, stations and brands could finally begin to reach similar audiences in their native tongue for the very first time.

The DAB+ content opportunity

We can’t talk about the potential of DAB+ without mentioning the content creation opportunity. Whereas the content presented on traditional radio has an audience ceiling (and is limited to the amount of FM frequencies available), DAB+ is essentially an unlimited opportunity. As more channels become available, the content opportunity grows, and more people (jobs) will be needed to populate that content. As has been seen in the upswing of podcasting, this allows brands to invest in people who are creating interesting, topical, and engaging content. DAB+ essentially becomes the new home of exciting, high quality content that is widely available for listeners to consume, purely based on their own personal interests and preferences.

An optimistic outlook for DAB+

Despite that it has taken a long time — as well as technical challenges and a cost barrier that will need to be dealt with — DAB+ shows real promise and opportunity in South Africa.

It has the potential to create an additional layer for broadcasters to work with, it exposes audiences previously kept in the dark to existing and niche programming, and it gives brands the opportunity to amplify their efforts while speaking directly to their target market in the process. Content creators will also have additional platforms and scope to create and express themselves on.

A blended approach seems the most logical approach as we look for ways to utilise (and monetise) the DAB+ spectrum. At AME we have always loved audio and the connection it makes with people. Our two radio stations (OFM and Algoa FM) are well positioned to create new listening opportunities for audiences outside their traditional FM reach. Our Team at the Central Media Group hold an ENCS license as our first step to leveraging the DAB+. Additional platforms and technology are good for the entire broadcast business from platform owners, technical suppliers, content creators and ultimately the audience. It is however in our hands as the industry to drive the process.

Fri, 16 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, Moneyweb

Moneyweb boasts a host of original podcasts that cover various themes and topics relevant in South Africa and abroad. All Moneyweb podcasts cover credible, verified and newsworthy content that influence and affect the day-to-day lives of our dynamic and varied audiences.

The Property Pod

The Property Pod is South Africa’s premier property investor podcast, with insights from industry executives. This podcast offers in-depth coverage of the local property sector, including commercial (office, retail and industrial/logistics) residential, and specialist sectors such as storage and healthcare. Each episode will cover industry developments, sector performance, trends, as well as new policies/laws affecting the sector from both local government and national government level. This podcast publishes two episodes per month. The Property Pod is hosted by Moneyweb’s deputy editor Suren Naidoo, who has a keen interest in property, tourism, retail, media and sports.

Click here to listen to or download Property Pod episodes.

The Money Savvy Podcast

Money Savvy features interviews with certified financial planners and wealth managers to answer readers’ pressing financial questions. Each episode will focus on a specific theme, covering topics such as retirement, retrenchments and investments, to help listeners make better financial decisions. This podcast publishes two episodes per month and is hosted by Boitumelo Ntsoko. Boitumelo is the editor of The Citizen newspaper’s business section, CitiBusiness (which Moneyweb manages), and is passionate about all things personal finance.

Click here to listen to or download episodes of the Money Savvy Podcast.

Moneyweb Crypto

Moneyweb Crypto with Ciaran Ryan explores all things crypto and blockchain: the good, the bad and the impossible. If you’re looking to invest in cryptocurrencies, or understand this evolving universe, you’re in the right place. Ciaran is a Johannesburg-based freelance writer who has a background in finance and mining, having previously headed up a gold mining operation in Ghana. He currently writes for several South African and overseas journals on matters ranging from mining to investment.

Click here to listen to or download episodes of Moneyweb Crypto.

MoneywebNOW

MoneywebNOW is South Africa’s premium business breakfast podcast show. The podcast can be livestreamed from Monday to Friday at 06:30, and downloaded from 07:00. The host, Simon Brown, is a trader, investor, money enthusiast, photographer, surfer and beach lover – who brings the latest in business, trading and investment news, as well as insights into world markets and company news, to get you ready for the trading day ahead. Whether you’re listening on your way to work or at home, the podcast promises punchy, informative and bite-sized interviews with industry experts, CEOs, entrepreneurs and more. The MoneywebNOW podcast has yielded just over 250 000 audio downloads in the short time since its inception.

Click here to listen to or download episodes.

Moneyweb podcasts available to download and listen to on the app. 
 ITUNES   IONO   SPOTIFY

This was originally published on Moneyweb.co.za here.

Mon, 12 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, OFM

This winter, Central South Africa feasted with a goal on Thursdays as OFM and Round Table Southern Africa joined forces to fight the freeze – with vetkoek!

Die Groot Vet Kombers Proe-jek challenged listeners to support a wide range of charities. OFM visited towns and cities in their broadcast region, where vetkoek with Beefmaster mince was sold at R35 each, but listeners were encouraged to make larger donations to charities in their region. In some cases, donations up to R10 000 were received!

Every Vetkoek Thursday, The Joyride team broadcast their show live from the charity drive to update the rest of Central South Africa on the project.

Purchases were made using a secure drive-through system, in line with Covid-19 regulations.

The project began on Thursday, 10 June, in Vryburg at Mams Megastop, where R68 522 was raised for Adrian Losper Soup Kitchen and Rusoord Old Age Home, in association with Round Table 72 Vryburg.

July 17 was Potchefstroom’s turn. Eastvaal Toyota hosted the team and R126 856 was raised for the Potchefstroom Dienssentrum vir Bejaardes, in association with Round Table 49 Potchefstroom.

On 24 June, vetkoek was sold at AgriMark Upington. R107 555 was raised for Leer & Leef Community Project, in association with Round Table 79 Upington.

Finally, on 1 July, OFM was at Empire Square SUPERSPAR, where R147 067 was collected for Engo’s Welriedal Boys and Girls Home, Merafong Children’s Home and Welkom Youth Care Centre, in association with Round Table 40 Welkom.

OFM and Round Table Southern Africa raised a total of R450 000 for charity!

According to Lindiwe Mtwentula, OFM Marketing Manager, “We as OFM are very proud to have been able to assist those in need this winter with this project. Our goal is to uplift the communities we broadcast to – in everything we do. This project showed immense love from our listeners and stakeholders and coming together to give back. Thank you.”

For more info, please contact Lindiwe Mtwentula on 051 5050 900, 082 416 1665, or lindiwe@ofm.co.za.

Tue, 06 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, OFM

 OFM, celebrating 35 years of the sound of your life, is offering listeners a chance to win big with the OFM Secret Song competition, on air from 2 to 30 July 2021! 

July has been earmarked as OFM’s ‘official’ birthday month, with special on-air birthday programming planned for Thursday, 1 July. From Friday, 2 July, listeners will be enticed with the exciting ‘Secret Song’ competition, where one lucky listener stands to win R35 000 cash for correctly guessing the title as well as the artist performing the song in question. 

OFM has selected a ‘secret song’, which was released roundabout 1986. A short clip of this song will be played on air throughout the month and listeners will be asked to guess what it is. 

To enter, listeners need to SMS the keyword ‘secret’ to 36636 (R1.50/SMS) with the full title of the song, as well as the artist. They also need to include their name and surname, and from where they are listening. Only entries that include all of the required information will be eligible. 

From 12 to 29 July 2021, OFM will select 35 finalists, who will be announced on air. Their names and song selections will be published on ofm.co.za. 

Once a song has been guessed, the finalist announced and the name displayed on the website, it is no longer in contention. Another song choice can then be guessed. Selected finalists’ choices are final, and they cannot enter another song choice. 

Clues as to what the song is can be obtained by SMSing ‘clue’ to 36636 (R1.50/SMS) from 2 July 2021. These clues will change from time to time. Keep an ear out as presenters will notify listeners of new clues being released. 

Says OFM Programme Manager, Tim Thabethe: “The ‘Secret Song’ concept is a tried and tested and fun competition mechanic that talks to OFM’s biggest product offering, which is music. 

“The R35 000 prize is a life-changing sum of money. OFM is driven to surprise and delight the listener and July presents one of three campaigns in 2021 that celebrate OFM’s 35th birthday. 

“The suspense of the Secret Song should create a lot of talkability among OFM’s listening audience,” concludes Thabethe. 

In the spirit of giving, OFM will waiver our 60 day winning rule, meaning that should you have won anything on OFM’s platforms on the last 60 days, you will still be eligible to enter the Secret Song competition. Other general competition rules will still apply and can be found on OFM’s website. 

Although there is only one grand prize of R35 000 cash, all finalists will receive limited edition retro OFM memorabilia in celebration of our 35th birthday year. 

The grand prize winner will be announced on OFM on 30 July 2021, during the Good Morning Breakfast, between 06:00 and 09:00. 

For more info, please contact Lindiwe Mtwentula on 051 5050 900, 082 416 1665, or lindiwe@ofm.co.za. 

Fri, 02 Jul 2021 / Published in LATEST NEWS, Moneyweb

SAfm Market Update with Moneyweb welcomes Fifi Peters as its new host.

Peters is an alumnus of the Bloomberg Media Initiative Africa Financial Journalism training programme and holds a degree in economics and journalism from Rhodes University, including qualifications from the SA Institute of Financial Journalism and London School of Economics.

“Fifi is an award-winning journalist and brings a wealth of financial journalism experience and tons of energy to the SAfm Market Update studio,” says Moneyweb editor Ryk van Niekerk. “She is an excellent addition to the Moneyweb team.”

Her career in business journalism spans 10 years, having worked for the likes of Business Day and Financial Mail. She currently hosts CNBC Africa’s flagship market shows Power Lunch and Closing Bell. She has a special interest in African financial markets, and is also a seasoned MC and moderator.

“I’m extremely excited to be joining such a respected and trusted source of news in South Africa,” says Peters.

“It’s an honour to be taking over from Nompu Siziba, whose work I have great admiration for as a journalist. I look forward to meeting South Africans via the airwaves and driving through all the factors moving markets, the economy and business.”

Peters assumes the role on Monday, July 5.

This article was first published on Moneyweb.co.za here.

Wed, 30 Jun 2021 / Published in AlgoaFM, LATEST NEWS

Have you heard the story about the Algoa FM ‘Madhatter’s Tea Party’ where presenter Charl Leslie was dressed as the March Hare from Alice in Wonderland and played musical chairs with clients?

Our sales team had created a promotional opportunity for a select group of clients.

The goal was to secure forward revenue around an idea where we effectively sold shows to sponsors for a week at a time.

We had the sales solution, but needed a creative hook.

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After much brainstorming we settled on a Madhatter’s Tea Party as our theme.

All we needed was the March Hare to host the day.

Up stepped the indomitable Mr.Charl Leslie, and the rest as they say, is history.

Whichever way you look at it, sales is a tough gig.

It’s my view that if you are really going to go for it, it had better be fun at least some of the time.

I mean if no-one’s having fun, what’s the point?

Delivering great work is so much easier when we are having fun, because if we’re not having fun, neither are our clients.

There is also a more serious business side to “fun” at Algoa FM.

“Our advertisers know that our media house is a fun place to work, but they also know we are an effective business with a positive workplace culture where business happens.”

Fun also allows us to boost engagement with our clients. They appreciate and understand the value of aligning their Brand with ours and the positive impact it has on their business.

Over the years, we’ve done loads of fun stuff with our clients, but The Madhatter’s Tea Party remains a firm favourite with me.

I have no doubt that fun will continue being a thing with us at Algoa FM.

How we continue to adapt in a Covid-restricted world sets us and our clients apart from everyone else.

Have you heard the one about the lady who walked into a business and said to the owner, “hi my name is Lesley Ann Fortuin from Algoa FM…but you can call me Bubbles?”

True story.

Dennis

About the author: Dennis Karantges – Algoa FM Sales Manager 

Dennis went from being a Client to Sales Manager in 2005. A marketer and sales person through-and-through, Dennis says “there’s a famous saying, ‘no one works until someone sells something’.

His advice to companies wanting to connect with customers from the Garden Route to the Wild Coast and through the Karoo, is: “Never take marketing your business or brand for granted. Make very sure you use the best advertising vehicle of delivery available to you in your chosen market. Seek their collaboration, then own your share of voice by being creative and keeping your marketing tuned in and switched on”.